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PBHE502 - Health Policy

Course Details

Course Code: PBHE502 Course ID: 2691 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Graduate

This course is designed to give the student an in-depth understanding of the roles that government and the consumer (the patient) can, and do, play in the ever-evolving health care industry. This course places special emphasis on politics and ethics and the results when they clash, as well as how politics and ethics form the mental attitudes of decision makers. This course is rich in information on the various political and ethical dilemmas facing the patients in the new millennium.





Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

After successfully completing this course, students will be able to:

1. Understand the critical factors that will influence health and health care in the first decade of the 21st century
2. Compare, contrast, seek answers, and formulate ideas regarding health care systems
3. Evaluate health care policies and their influence on the development, operation, design and effectiveness of health care delivery systems
4. Assess the efficacy of public health programs and initiatives such as Medicare, Medicaid and State Children’s Health Insurance Program (S-CHIP)
5. Examine the effects of unhealthy lifestyles and choices on the American Health Care System
6. Understand how the overall health of a nation directs that Nation’s policy and national interests
7. Identify health care disparities in the American Health Care System and create solutions reducing the uneven ‘health care burden’ of disparate populations

Discussions:

Please join the Discussion each week. Replies must be posted in the week due and replies after the end of the each week will not be graded or receive credit. The discussions are for student interaction and input and must be submitted before the week ends in order to receive full credit. Students should demonstrate their own knowledge in the discussions and avoid copying and pasting from websites. The Rubric is attached to discussion description.

Guidelines:

Initial Response:

  • Post your initial response to each discussion by 11:55pm, ET, Wednesday.
  • Initial responses should have substance where students explore, explain, and expand upon issues being discussed, and apply relevant course materials.
  • Students should analyze course concepts, theories or materials correctly, using examples or supporting evidence.
  • Initial responses should be supported by at least two references (APA referencing format is not required for discussions)

Peer Responses:

  • For each discussion, reply to at least 2 of your classmates by 11:55pm, ET, Sunday.
  • Students are required to respond to at least two (2) other student’s initial postings (and the instructor) with significant comments that have substance.
  • Students should collaborate with fellow learners, relating the discussion to course concepts, add several innovative ideas, and provide considerable additional insight that relates to core concepts.
  • Peer responses should include at least two (2) of the following components: Offering advice; posing a question; providing an alternative point-of-view; and acknowledging similar experiences.
  • Peer responses should be supported by at least one reference (APA referencing format is not required for discussions)
  • All discussions can be accessed in the discussion section of the course.
  • A Discussion rubric is included in the discussion section of the course
  • More in-depth specific instructions for each discussion can be found in the discussion tab within the course.
  • Late Discussion posts receive a 10% per day late penalty. If your 2 peer responses are posted after the week is ended (after Day 7, Sunday) they receive a zero, and that the discussion is finished. You cannot receive credit for participation in a discussion with others after the discussion week has closed.
  • If there are less than 3 students in the course, only one (1) peer posting will be required. Your peer postings should challenge or expound upon at least one of the points made by your peer, and “I agree” does not constitute as an adequate response. As graduate students, you will be expected to provide comprehensive, relevant and well supported points in your assignments.

We all bring something unique to the classroom, from our understanding, our experiences, and our value systems. We honor and respect each person’s diverse beliefs to help us see beyond the classroom to be the most effective individuals we can be. Therefore, we should all be respectful of others while expressing our viewpoints and opinions. Proper Netiquette behavior is expected. Any inflammatory, demeaning or disrespectful language in a posting will be immediately removed from the discussion space.

Weekly Essays: There will be seven (7) weekly essays in this course. Each weekly essay is due in the Assignment portal of the classroom by Sunday, 11:55 p.m. EST each week. Make sure you read and understand the directions for each assignment. Each assignment should be a minimum of two full pages of text in length and have a minimum of at least (2) outsides sources (not our course text) in your response. Please ensure that you cite your references in APA format.

Research Paper: Please select a topic related to Health Policy for your final paper. You may select a current health care policy (e.g. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act), a specific program (e.g. Medicare, Medicaid, and State Child Health Insurance Plan) or you can select any other health care system (e.g. Health Management Organization, Preferred Provider Organization). In addition, government health policy is a fantastic topic; however, you must go in-depth with your assessments and provide empirical evidence from scientific literature.

Please review the Final Paper Grading Rubric prior to submission (Click on View IRubric in the main Assignment List page).

Paper is due in the Assignment portion of the classroom by Sunday, 11:55 p.m. EST each week. Make sure you read and understand the directions and requirements for each Assignment. Please ensure you cite your references in APA format with a minimum of 7 references (You may use your textbook as a reference and you should have a minimum of 6 academic outside references including 3 peer-reviewed journal articles).

The Final Paper must have a minimum of 10 pages for a Graduate level course (excluding the title, abstract, and reference pages). The paper must be typed, double-spaced with 1-inch margins in 12-point Times New Roman font with all references cited. As always, Wikipedia, Wikianswers, and Answers.com are NOT academic/scholarly sources. Papers will be graded based on the following areas: Foundation and synthesis of knowledge, application of knowledge critical thinking, writing skills, use of computer technology and application, and organization of ideas and format. Refer to Library Online Resource Center for any research assistance. Refer to the Student Handbook for policies relevant to academic honesty and other procedures and policies related to this course.

A Grade Papers = ABOVE COURSE STANDARDS (ACS)

The principle characteristic of the ACS paper is rich content; teaching the reader sentence after sentence, paragraph after paragraph. In composition, it is marked by stylistic finesse: the title and opening paragraph are engaging; the transitions are artful; the phrasing is tight, fresh, and highly specific; the sentence structure is varied; the tone enhances the purposes of the paper. Finally, the ACS paper, because of its careful organization, development, and logic imparts a sense of completeness and unusual clarity. An ACS paper is highly instructive for other (and future) members of the course; as a result, it is publishable.

B Grade Papers = MET COURSE STANDARDS (MCS)

This paper is more than competent. In addition to being almost free of mechanical error, the MCS paper gives the reader substantial information of quantity, interest, and scholarly value. Its specific points are logically ordered, well developed, and unified around an organizing principle that is clear. The opening paragraph draws the reader in; the closing paragraph is both conclusive and thematically related to the opening. The transitions between paragraphs are for the most part smooth and the sentence structures pleasingly varied. The diction of the MCS paper is typically much more concise and precise than found in the BCS paper. Occasionally, it even shows distinctiveness and finesse. Overall, an MCS paper makes the reading experience pleasurable, one that offers substantial information with few distractions.

C Papers = BELOW COURSE STANDARDS (BCS)

The paper is generally competent. It meets the assignment, has few mechanical errors, and is reasonably well organized and developed. The actual information-content is either thin and commonplace or made to seem so. The ideas are vague generalities; they prompt the reader in some confusion to ask margin questions "In every case or why or how or how many...? How do we know this?" Stylistically, the BCS paper has shortcomings as well: the opening paragraph does little to draw in the reader; the final paragraph offers only a perfunctory wrap-up; the transitions between paragraphs are often bumpy; the sentences, while choppy, follow a predictable (and monotonous) subject-verb-object pattern; and the diction is occasionally marred by unconscious repetitions, redundancy, and imprecision. The BCS paper gets the job done but lacks imagination and intellectual rigor; rereading would be a chore.

D Papers = UNACCEPTABLE EFFORT (UE). Not Graduate Level Work.

Please refer to the Student Handbook for policies relevant to academic honesty and other procedures and policies related to this course. Refer to Online Resource Center for any research assistance.

  • More in-depth specific instructions for each assignment can be found in the Assignment tab within the course.
  • Assignments submitted late without advance notice will receive a 5% per day late penalty and will not be accepted for grading five (5) days past the due date.
  • Refer to the Lessons and Resources sections in the classroom for information about all readings in this course.
  • Each week’s Lesson contains all the material for the week.
  • For most weeks, course readings are a mix of professional sources (such as peer-reviewed journal articles and governmental publications) and “popular” sources, such as newspaper articles, professional magazine articles, and websites intended for the public. All required course readings are freely downloadable from the course website or from other websites.

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 7th Edition. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Other materials can be found in the Lessons section of the course.

Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.*
ISBN:ERESERVE NOTE

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.