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IntelHub

IntelHub

Unlike the work of intelligence services, that primarily need to be conducted with the tools of secrecy, intelligence studies scholarship benefits from openness, the encouragement of sharing methods, processes, and sources, as well as full transparency in the process of advancing knowledge, discussing results, solving relevant controversies, and transferring that knowledge and best practices to society.

The School of Security and Global Studies at American Public University and American Military University, School of History, Politics and International Relations at the University of Leicester in the UK, and Rey Juan Carlos University in Spain are leading providers of postgraduate intelligence education in their respective countries, each with an outward-looking institutional focus on internationalization and commitment to maximizing the benefits this can bring to their students. Developed in collaboration, IntelHub aims to connect scholars and researchers from intelligence studies, security studies, related academic fields and disciplines, as well as professionals worldwide to share their knowledge and provide an opportunity to build a robust international network for the study of intelligence.

Unlike the work of intelligence services, that primarily need to be conducted with the tools of secrecy, intelligence studies scholarship benefits from openness, the encouragement of sharing methods, processes, and sources, as well as full transparency in the process of advancing knowledge, discussing results, solving relevant controversies, and transferring that knowledge and best practices to society.

The School of Security and Global Studies at American Public University and American Military University, School of History, Politics and International Relations at the University of Leicester in the UK, and Rey Juan Carlos University in Spain are leading providers of postgraduate intelligence education in their respective countries, each with an outward-looking institutional focus on internationalization and commitment to maximizing the benefits this can bring to their students. Developed in collaboration, IntelHub aims to connect scholars and researchers from intelligence studies, security studies, related academic fields and disciplines, as well as professionals worldwide to share their knowledge and provide an opportunity to build a robust international network for the study of intelligence.

Upcoming Events

Hostage Negotiation: An International Scenario and Intelligence-Based Approach

Intelhub Speaker Series: Dr. Sabrina Magris
Attend Webinar  February 20, 2019 at 10am ET

Hostage Negotiation is a multifaceted topic as it combines psychological and behavioral aspects with intelligence analysis and operational intelligence work. For these reasons it is considered top-level operational intelligence. To be successful hostage negotiation requires a strong equilibrium among the team members and, at the same time, a strong skilled chief negotiator. A hostage-taking incident can occur in every country and in different scenarios. However, international attention is now directed on kidnappings that occur abroad in complex environments, and on kidnapping for ransom (KFR) made by terrorists. Key questions that arise include how can real information be gathered? How should the money be followed and how can the flow of funds of terrorist organizations be combatted? How can kidnappings planned and conducted by terrorist groups be distinguished from those conducted by local criminal actors? These are some of the challenges that the international hostage negotiator must cope and deal with. Military staff, civilians and private-company employers are all figures that can be at risk while working abroad or in a foreign country. The complexity of hostage negotiation is made-up of all the different scenarios, people, and organizations the negotiator must know in order to effectively conduct the negotiation. This is one reason hostage negotiation is such a complicated, multifaceted and multidimensional task which must follow basic rules that can be applied to different situations and contexts. With the recent modifications that the terrorism has gone trough recently, hostage kidnapping has become the most important source of money for terrorist groups.

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Disrupt and Deny: British Covert Action and Foreign Policy

Intelhub Speaker Series: Rory Cormac
Attend Webinar  March 7, 2019 at 10am ET

Covert action is a state’s unacknowledged interference in the affairs of others. Such activity has featured prominently in international security discourse since Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014. It is most often associated with Russia and the United States. However, the UK also has a long track record of covert action dating back as far as the reign of Elizabeth I. This session outlines what covert action entails, why the so-called “quiet option” has long appealed to political leaders, and what constitutes success in this inherently controversial instrument of foreign policy. It then examines the UK experience more closely, explaining how historical, bureaucratic, and political factors shape British approaches to – and use of – covert action.

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Disinformation Wars: What Russian Active Measures Reveal About American Passive Society

Intelhub Speaker Series: Matthew Crosston
Attend Webinar  April 24, 2019 at 10am ET

While there has been passionate talk about what measures were taken by Russian intelligence to interfere with and/or undermine American democracy during the 2016 Presidential election (and beyond), the emphasis has largely been on the technical aspects of the initiatives and the possible consequences on foreign affairs. What has been ignored is the examination of how/why such measures have been so successful and continue to have lives of their own, especially amongst purely American partisan groups, both left and right. This talk reveals how Russian strategy actually revealed important, and disturbing, elements of contemporary American society, the state of domestic politics in the US, and certain failures of the American education system in terms of civic education, citizenship, and learning in general.

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Insurgent use of Intelligence

Intelhub Speaker Series: Dr. David Strachan-Morris, Lecturer in Intelligence and Security at the University of Leicester, England.
Coming Soon.

The last two decades have seen arguably the most extended period of Counterinsurgency Warfare in recent warfare and with this has come intensive professional and academic study of how to conduct counterinsurgency. While this has included work on how to conduct intelligence in a counterinsurgency campaign, the insurgents themselves are treated almost exclusively as targets to be acted upon rather than intelligence actors in their own right. A forthcoming series of articles in Intelligence and National Security will address this shortcoming, covering a diverse range of campaigns in order to shed light on this aspect of intelligence. In this webinar Dr. David Strachan-Morris will discuss his contribution to the series, which draws on the Second Indochina War as a case study, particularly the period from the start of the American participation until the fall of Saigon in 1975, to examine the use of intelligence in support of the guerrilla campaign in South Vietnam. He will talk about some of the unique aspects of the insurgent use of intelligence in the context of the hybrid campaign in Vietnam, making comparisons with modern day insurgencies, and highlight some of the wider lessons on politicisation, intelligence failure, and the interaction between tactical and strategic intelligence. This webinar will be of interest to anyone looking at the use of intelligence by insurgents in particular or non-state actors in general.

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Intelhub Speaker Series Archives

Grey Spaces: Commercial OSINT Provision   Presented January 24, 2019.
Robert Munks & Terry Pattar

Intelligence, Biosecurity, and Bioterrorism   Presented November 29, 2018.
Dr. Patrick Walsh, Associate Professor, at the Australian Graduate School of Policing and Security, Charles Sturt University, Australia.

Principled Spying: The Ethics of Secret Intelligence   Presented October 22, 2018.
Dr. Mark Phythian, School of History, Politics and International Relations, University of Leicester, UK

Understanding Threats, Adversaries, and Competitors Through Threat Profiling   Presented September 27, 2018.
Erik Kleinsmith

Open Source Intelligence   Presented May 21, 2018.
Arno H.P. Reuser 

Rethinking Intelligence   Presented April 25, 2018.
Randolph H. Pherson

Ethical Espionage: Beyond Professional Oversight   Presented March 21, 2018.
Dr. Jan Goldman

Discussion on the Global Security and Intelligence Studies Journal   Presented February 27, 2018. 
Dr. Melissa Schnyder and Dr. Matthew Crosston

Extremism, Radicalization and Security. An Identity Theory Approach   Presented December 14, 2017.
Julian Richards

EU Intelligence and the importance of international cooperation in intelligence   Presented Oct 25, 2017.
José-Miguel Palacios

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IntelHub Founding Directors

Nicole Drumhiller

Dr. Nicole Drumhiller, Ph.D.
School of Security and Global Studies, American Public University System, USA

Mark Phythian

Dr. Mark Phythian
School of History, Politics and International Relations, University of Leicester, UK

Ruben Arcos

Dr. Rubén Arcos, Ph.D.
Department of Communication Sciences and Sociology, Rey Juan Carlos University, Spain